THIS WEEK

IN INDIANA HISTORY

​OCTOBER 14 - OCTOBER  20


1851     Congregational Friends held a convention in Dublin, Indiana, at which they adopted resolutions for political, social, and financial rights for women.  Men and women in attendance favored abolition, temperance, and women’s suffrage.       

 1873     Raymond Ewry was born in Lafayette.  After a childhood spent in a wheelchair with polio, he overcame his illness and became one of the best standing jump champions of the world.  He won a total of eight gold medals in Olympic games.  

 1894     British author Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, gave a lecture at Plymouth Church in Indianapolis.  Later that evening he had dinner with Hoosier Poet James Whitcomb Riley. 

 1932     Alice Roosevelt Longworth, daughter of former President Theodore Roosevelt, received an enthusiastic reception at the Claypool Hotel in Indianapolis.  Nearly 5,000 attended the event which the Indianapolis Star called the “most remarkably distinctive women’s meeting in the history of Indiana politics.” 

 1932    The cornerstone was laid for the new Indiana State Library on East Ohio Street in Indianapolis.  Indiana Governor Harry G. Leslie said the event was “the realization of a dream of many years.”  Items placed in the cornerstone included the Governor’s address, records of the building commission, state yearbooks, and city newspapers.

 1948     President Harry Truman gave a major campaign address at the Indiana World War Memorial.  He was introduced to a crowd of over 200,00 by Indianapolis Mayor Al Feeney.  Later the President visited the Masonic Hall in Beech Grove.